Archive | Genealogy Industry

04 May 2010 ~ 2 Comments

Family Tree Magazine 2010 Media Kit

Family Tree Magazine

For an eye-opening look at the genealogy and family history industry, check out the 2010 Media Kit for Family Tree Magazine (warning – the download is a 4MB pdf!)

While the kit is meant to help sell advertising at Family Tree Magazine, I find it is good for analyzing recent information on the genealogy industry, the target market, etc.  In addition, you can see the proposed topics for upcoming 2010 editions.

©2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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28 April 2010 ~ 1 Comment

APG Reaches 2000th Member Mark!

Association of Professional Genealogists

We just received the following information from the Association of Professional Genealogists – and congratulations on this wonderful accomplishment of 2,000 members!

Association of Professional Genealogists Grows to More than 2,000 Members

Growing Interest in Genealogy Drives Need for Professionals

WESTMINSTER, Colo. and SALT LAKE CITY, April 28, 2010 – Today at the National Genealogical Society Family History Conference in Salt Lake City, the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) announced that it has just surpassed the 2,000-membership mark. As the world’s leading professional organization of family history and related professionals, the APG supports professional genealogists throughout the world.

“This milestone comes at a time when interest in genealogy is mushrooming, as both a pastime and a profession,” said APG President Laura Prescott. “Recent television shows like NBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” and PBS’s “Faces of America” have helped raise awareness and stimulate interest from a broader audience. This increase in interest is leading more people to hire genealogists and we’ll need more professionals in the field. APG helps professionals develop their skills and build their networks, while promoting standards and ethics.”

The APG has experienced steady growth in membership since its founding more than 30 years ago. With 23 local chapters in the U.S. and Canada, the organization supports a variety of professions within the field, including researchers, librarians, editors, archivists, lecturers, event planners and more.

Visitors to this week’s National Genealogical Society Family History Conference may learn more by visiting the APG booth, number 314. Booth volunteers are available to answer questions regarding how to hire a professional genealogist, use the APG online directory of professionals, and become a professional genealogist. Visitors will also find a list of APG members who are giving lectures at the conference.

About the Association of Professional Genealogists The Association of Professional Genealogists (http://www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,000 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers, and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring, and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy, local, and social history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada, and thirty other countries.

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This is great news for the genealogy industry as well as the field of genealogy as it continues to progress as a profession!  I am a proud member of APG and depend upon its resources constantly.  Please consider joining APG even if you aren’t a professional – if just to follow the genealogy industry.

©2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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24 March 2010 ~ 3 Comments

Sued For Genealogy Research – Could It Happen To You?

scales of justice

What if you could be sued for your genealogy research – even if it were true?  This is what happened to one of the authors of Weird Ohio which published a true story about one Ohio family’s history.  And a descendant brought a “false light” lawsuit against the authors.

A Genealogy Ghost Story

Making this long story short: a segment of the book recounted a mass murder by a family member and resulting ghost legends/stories at the location.  The plaintiff in the suit contended that such information caused visitors and “ghost hunters” to trespass on the properly and and bring “unreasonable publicity to one’s private life.”  You can read more about the lawsuit at the Oxford University Press USA website.  The Ohio Court of Appeals site has a recent opinion (opens in PDF) from 23 December 2009.

What isn’t clear even from my reading of the court papers is whether such a murder did in fact take place.  The issue seems to be the resulting “legend” and “stories” about the haunting of the location.

Could I Be Sued For Factually Correct Genealogy Research?

I don’t stay awake at night worrying about this but I guess it could happen if I were to add legends and mythology to a family history which can’t be proven through the Genealogical Proof Standard.  As a professional genealogist, I would want to – as Joe Friday would say – “just state the facts ma’am.”

It is one thing to make a conclusion as to relationships, offspring, etc.  It is another thing to try and validate local legends or family stories.  Care should be taken to document any “family stories” as to their source if they are used to “round out” research.  There are often living descendants who may not agree with the depiction of their ancestors.  Keeping to the facts – proven and properly sourced via citations – can help avoid any misunderstandings as to an interpretation of family history.

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Thanks to Mike Brubaker of History by Brubaker for alerting me and other genealogy bloggers to the recent lawsuit.

©2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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