Archive | Genealogy Industry

04 May 2010 ~ 6 Comments

Ratings Analysis of Who Do You Think You Are?

Who Do You Think You Are?

The American version of the Who Do You Think You Are? television series just completed its first season on Friday, 30 April 2010.  Beginning on 5 March 2010 and running for seven episodes during a nine-week period, below is my interpretation of the ratings as measured by major television rating services.

Ratings Comparison – Table

(Click to embiggen all tables and images)

WDYTYA ratings table

Ratings Comparison – Charts

WDYTYA viewers

WDYTYA ratings

WDYTYA share

Comparison of Overall Ratings and 18-49 year old Ratings

WDYTYA rating comp

Comparison of Overall Share and 18-49 year old Share

WDYTYA share comp

WDYTYA timeslot rank

WDYTYA evening rank

Analysis

  • Episode 3 with Lisa Kudrow was the first episode up against NCAA March Madness games on CBS.  Note the slight drop in ratings for the 18-49 age group (from 1.8% to 1.7%) as compared to an increase for the overall (4.5% to 4.7%).
  • Episode 4 with Matthew Broderick – major impact of NCAA Sweet Sixteen on CBS.  The episode focused on military history which would have pulled a large male viewership but they were off watching the games.
  • Episode 5 with Brooke Shields didn’t see a major rebound in numbers from the Broderick lows what with CBS back to its regular programming.
  • While the overall ratings resumed climbing with Episode 6 (Sarandon), for the 18-49 age group the ratings never really recovered and continued to decrease through to Episode 7.
  • Episode 6 with Susan Sarandon had the highest evening ranking (2) of any of the WDYTYA episodes.  April 2nd was also Good Friday with more older viewers at home.
  • Evidence that Episode 7 with Spike Lee may have fared worse with older viewers who might see him as a polarizing figure:  full percentage decline (8.0% to 7.0%) overall but remained the same (5.0%) for 18-49 age group.  This was also one of the lowest evening ranked episodes of the WDYTYA series at 7.

Conclusion

I think for its first season – and an abbreviated season at that – Who Do You Think You Are? did very well and did a good job at bringing the fields of genealogy and family history front-and-center for American viewers.

Will Season 2 be able to build upon the ratings seen above?  That remains to be seen especially since Season 1 relied heavily upon marketing during NBC’s Winter Olympics coverage.  That marketing venue won’t be available but I expect that Ancestry.com – the major sponsor of WDYTYA – will continue its connection with the show.  In fact, my next analysis will be reviewing the impact that WDYTYA has had on website visits, revenues, etc.

Oh, and how did WDYTYA stack up against Roots, the mini-series which debuted in 1977 on ABC?  Well to be fair, this was back before cable television, the Internets, and DVRs had an impact on television.  But the figures are here.  An average rating of 45% with a 66% share? Not even close.

Stay tuned.

Sources

(Arranged in episode/date order)

©2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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04 May 2010 ~ 2 Comments

Family Tree Magazine 2010 Media Kit

Family Tree Magazine

For an eye-opening look at the genealogy and family history industry, check out the 2010 Media Kit for Family Tree Magazine (warning – the download is a 4MB pdf!)

While the kit is meant to help sell advertising at Family Tree Magazine, I find it is good for analyzing recent information on the genealogy industry, the target market, etc.  In addition, you can see the proposed topics for upcoming 2010 editions.

©2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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28 April 2010 ~ 1 Comment

APG Reaches 2000th Member Mark!

Association of Professional Genealogists

We just received the following information from the Association of Professional Genealogists – and congratulations on this wonderful accomplishment of 2,000 members!

Association of Professional Genealogists Grows to More than 2,000 Members

Growing Interest in Genealogy Drives Need for Professionals

WESTMINSTER, Colo. and SALT LAKE CITY, April 28, 2010 – Today at the National Genealogical Society Family History Conference in Salt Lake City, the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) announced that it has just surpassed the 2,000-membership mark. As the world’s leading professional organization of family history and related professionals, the APG supports professional genealogists throughout the world.

“This milestone comes at a time when interest in genealogy is mushrooming, as both a pastime and a profession,” said APG President Laura Prescott. “Recent television shows like NBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” and PBS’s “Faces of America” have helped raise awareness and stimulate interest from a broader audience. This increase in interest is leading more people to hire genealogists and we’ll need more professionals in the field. APG helps professionals develop their skills and build their networks, while promoting standards and ethics.”

The APG has experienced steady growth in membership since its founding more than 30 years ago. With 23 local chapters in the U.S. and Canada, the organization supports a variety of professions within the field, including researchers, librarians, editors, archivists, lecturers, event planners and more.

Visitors to this week’s National Genealogical Society Family History Conference may learn more by visiting the APG booth, number 314. Booth volunteers are available to answer questions regarding how to hire a professional genealogist, use the APG online directory of professionals, and become a professional genealogist. Visitors will also find a list of APG members who are giving lectures at the conference.

About the Association of Professional Genealogists The Association of Professional Genealogists (http://www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,000 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers, and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring, and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy, local, and social history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada, and thirty other countries.

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This is great news for the genealogy industry as well as the field of genealogy as it continues to progress as a profession!  I am a proud member of APG and depend upon its resources constantly.  Please consider joining APG even if you aren’t a professional – if just to follow the genealogy industry.

©2010, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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